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What’s the Connection Between Collagen and Vitamin C?

3 min read

sliced oranges on kitchen counter

By Lauren Panoff, MPH, RD

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body. In order to produce it, your body requires many other nutrients in addition to just amino acids, the building blocks of protein. One such essential nutrient for collagen production is Vitamin C. 

The Role Vitamin C in Collagen Synthesis

Vitamin C is an antioxidant, or a compound that fights oxidative damage from free radicals in the body. It’s also an essential cofactor in the production of collagen, meaning that your body cannot make collagen without adequate Vitamin C. 

Vitamin C is a necessary component of collagen synthesis, making it an important nutrient to include in your diet, and to supplement with as needed. 

Vitamin C is needed for important functions related to connective tissues, such as wound healing and maintenance of skin integrity. It also essentially helps hold our cells together during collagen production, and directs other compounds on what to do during this process.

Vitamin C is a necessary component of collagen synthesis, making it an important nutrient to include in your diet, and to supplement with as needed. 

Specifically, Vitamin C plays a role in influencing the function of a protein called prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD), which prepares the amino acid proline to produce collagen.

Scurvy is a perfect example of the role of Vitamin C in collagen synthesis. Scurvy is a disease of Vitamin C deficiency, in which the integrity of connective tissue declines, leading to poor healing wounds and lesions on the skin. The disease can be remedied through adequate replenishment of Vitamin C, which helps the body regain the ability to produce collagen and improve the integrity of connective tissues. 

What Influences Vitamin C and Collagen Levels?

As you age, both your collagen and Vitamin C stores tend to naturally decline. 

Furthermore, bodily Vitamin C levels can be largely influenced by stress. Mental stress, environmental toxins, smoking, infection and illness, certain medications, and even consuming beverages with a diuretic effect like coffee can all deplete Vitamin C.

Incorporating a variety of Vitamin C-rich foods into your diet is a great way to boost your body’s stores on a daily basis. 

Vitamin C is also a water-soluble vitamin, meaning that it’s not stored long-term. Water-soluble vitamins are used up as needed and any remaining amounts are typically excreted through urine. Thus, they need to be consumed on a daily basis to make sure the body has enough stores. 

How to Get Adequate Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a necessary component of collagen synthesis, making it an important nutrient to include in your diet, and to supplement with as needed. Without adequate Vitamin C, your body will struggle to synthesize new collagen.

The Recommended Dietary  Allowance for Vitamin C is 90 mg per day for men and 75 mg for women. This can be easily met through diet alone. Vitamin C can be found in fruits and vegetables, such as broccoli, oranges, dark leafy greens, bell peppers, cantaloupe, kiwi, berries, Brussels sprouts and tomatoes. Incorporating a variety of Vitamin C-rich foods into your diet is a great way to boost your body’s stores on a daily basis. Also consider looking for a collagen product that contains additional Vitamin C to support collagen production.

Unlike some other collagen supplements, Native Origins Collagen Peptides contains microencapsulated Vitamin C for improved flavor and to promote natural synthesis of collagen. With our 90-Day Money-Back Guarantee why not take a shot and "C" what it can do for you?

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