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Tips to Relieve Restless Legs

2 min read

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by Bradley Gillespie, PharmD

Since everyone's experience with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is different, and is likely caused by a wide variety of factors, effective relief will also vary. An excellent strategy is to make Calm Legs the centerpiece of your management approach. There are a number of simple lifestyle changes that may be able to work synergistically, enhancing the effects of Calm Legs.

These include:

  • Try using over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen, to relieve the pain sometimes associated with RLS.
  • Soaking in a warm bath and/or massaging your legs can sometimes relax your muscles and ease your symptoms.
  • Many people feel some relief by alternating hot or cold packs. This approach may lessen the severity of the sensations felt in your legs.
  • Stress can aggravate the symptoms of RLS. Relaxation techniques, such as meditation and yoga — especially just prior to bed — are helpful to some patients
  • Fatigue often worsens the symptoms of RLS. As a result, getting the enough quality sleep is critical. It is important to establish consistent sleep patterns to enhance any rest you are able to get.
  • Moderate, regular exercise may help to relieve some of the symptoms of RLS. At the same time, overdoing it, or exercising too late in the day, may worsen symptoms.
  • In many cases, reducing or eliminating the intake of caffeine may help. Eliminate consumption of caffeine-containing products for a few weeks to see if it benefits you.
  • Alcohol and tobacco should be used sparingly, if at all, as these substances are known to aggravate or trigger symptoms of RLS. As with caffeine, an avoidance test may be useful.

While Calm Legs is an excellent natural remedy, remember that RLS is a complicated condition with multiple causes and triggers. As such, it is a good idea to also try a variety of lifestyle changes for best results.


Restless Legs sufferer Bradley Gillespie, PharmD, trained as a clinical pharmacist and has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 20-plus years. Currently, he supports efforts at the National Institutes of Health to develop therapeutics for rare and neglected diseases. He remains a registered pharmacist and operates a medical writing business.


Restless Legs sufferer Bradley Gillespie, PharmD, is trained as a clinical pharmacist and has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 20-plus years. Currently, he supports efforts at the National Institutes of Health to develop therapeutics for rare and neglected diseases. He remains a registered pharmacist and operates a medical writing business.